Don’t Use These for Skin Tags on Eyelids

Removing a skin tag on eyelids is something you need to think through carefully—if you’re thinking of using a home remedy, or OTC removal product. While there are remedies and products that can easily remove skin tags, almost all of them are not safe to use on eyelid skin tags; even all natural remedies are not safe.

What should you avoid, and what should you do instead? Read on to find the answers to these critical questions.

Unsafe Remedies & Products

There are many remedies and products that can easily remove skin tags. However, the problem is most of them are way too risky to use around your eyes. Almost all of them requires the use of some chemical, oil, or unsafe method that jeopardizes the safety of your eyes.

If you’re trying to cut back on cost, just keep in mind that it’s going to cost you a whole lot more to try and save your vision should something go wrong. That in itself is a gamble because there’s no guarantee you’ll be able to achieve that. So avoid these remedies and treatments and consider the safer options (which I get to later further down).

Cutting Off Skin Tag on Eyelids

don't use this for skin tag on eyelidThis is a pretty common advice (both on the internet and off). Ask around for answers and you’re bound to run into someone who will suggest just clipping it off.  Some will say nail clippers, others will say scissors and you might even hear a few razor blades. All of them are bad choices. For eyelid skin tags, trying to cut it off yourself at home is probably one of the worst mistakes you can make.

Aside from the risk of accidentally poking your eyes out with whatever your tool of choice is, you also risk an infection. You can try sanitizing the tool all you want, but there’s always that chance. I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t risk my sight. I would not attempt to cut off skin tags growing on my eyelids; and I recommend you don’t try it at home either.

Wart/Mole Removal Products

Some people like to use OTC products like Compound W (a wart remover), to remove a skin tags. That’s fine, and many have had great success using otc treatments on skin tags. However, all the cases where it turned out good did not involve removing skin tags growing on/around the eyelids. You’re playing with some potentially harmful chemicals that should be kept far away from your eyes and your face in general.

Just think of it this way. What you’re using is strong enough to kill the skin tissues of unwanted warts and skin tags. Imagine having an accident and getting this stuff in your eyes. The damage could be irreversible.

ACV

Apple cider vinegar is an effective home remedy for skin tags, but I wouldn’t use it for a skin tag on the eyelids. You might be thinking since acv is all natural, it should be safe. It’s fairly safe, but only when used far away from the face and especially the eyes. Do not use it hear your eyes.

The problem with acv is using it for skin tag removal requires applying undiluted acv to the skin tag for an extended period of time. When used like this, it burns the skin tissue and eventually kills it. It’ll do exactly that no matter where you apply it. Don’t even think about trying to keep the acv from getting into your eyes. You’ll end up getting some in your eyes regardless of your efforts.

Consistent exposure to pure, undiluted acv will definitely cause a lot of damages that can’t be fixed. It’ll also burn like crazy and the pain will be enough to send you crying out in regret. Don’t even attempt to use acv for skin tags growing on or near your eye lids. In fact, don’t use it near your face. Save it for skin tags that are far away from sensitive areas.

Tea Tree Oil & Other Essential Oils

If you can’t use acv, then what about the other popular natural remedies for skin tags (like tea tree oil)? All of them should be crossed off your list of options too. All of these essential oils commonly used to remedy skin tags will have the same effect and the same problem as apple cider vinegar. Bottom line, don’t use essential oils to remove skin tag on eyelids.

Recommended Treatments for Skin Tags on Eyelids

Honestly, you shouldn’t treat skin tag on eyelids at home. They’re located in such a sensitive area and there’s no room for errors or accidents. Just one thing going wrong could lead to permanent injuries that can greatly affect you.

The first thing I would recommend for skin tag on eyelids is the plain old, overheard, suggestion to just leave it alone. If you haven’t already heard it hundreds of times already, most skin tags are harmless. In most cases you can just leave them alone. If it’s not that big and it doesn’t cause you great discomfort, or pain then this option should be considered carefully. It would be wise to have it checked out; just to rule out anything that could be more serious.

The second—and last–thing I will recommend for skin tag on eyelids is to consult with a professional about removal. Talk to either your family doctor, or dermatologist. In rare cases, insurance will cover removal. However, most medical insurances consider skin tag removal a cosmetic procedure and will not cover them. The only way to make sure your insurance will cover it is to call your insurance company. To get a rough idea of how much removal will cost, go to this page.

You might be thinking these are horrible recommendations (especially for a remedies site like this one) and I agree with you. However, I really feel there isn’t a very good do-it-at-home treatment due to the risks.

So then why even bother to talk about this here? I had to; because there’s a lot of misinformation around saying you can use the very treatments I said to avoid (from above). I want to make sure you and other readers know about the safety risks.

What Others Have Tried

Alright, I won’t leave you empty handed with nothing but a, “Go see your doctor”. There is one skin tag remedy that has been used with some degree of success—without a lot of the risks. It’s actually a spin-off of the floss skin tag remedy. Actually, the only difference is you don’t use floss (especially the minty stuff). You use finer thread instead (I guess you can argue that it’s not a spin-off at all).

Some people say to use cotton thread, but there is a safer opton you can use. You can buy sterile suture thread to use instead. I myself would prefer to use sterile threads. You can find both nylon and silk suture threads online. Using silk threads might be a little bit less uncomfortable, but not by much; there’s going to be some level of discomfort regardless of what you use.

One problem with this remedy though is you’ll likely need the help of another person. It’s going to be hard and frustrating to try and tie a thread around a tiny skin tag located on your eyelid. It’s not impossible to do this by yourself, but you can get it done a lot faster if you had someone to help.

Whether you attempt to do this by yourself, or you get someone else to help out, make sure you tie the string around the stalk (towards the base of the skin tag) very tightly. Just keep in mind that the tighter you tie the thread, the more uncomfortable it becomes.

Tying them down with sterile threads is probably the only home remedy that you should consider for removing skin tag on eyelids. The other stuff is way too harsh and way too risky for your sensitive eyes. Even though it carries less risk, it’s still best to consult with your doctor first. Your eyes are worth way more than the cost of a doctor’s visit.